Archive for the ‘AV Club’ Tag

Mad Men — Once in a Lifetime

Saturday, April 4th, 2015

My superfan mix, set to Talking Heads. Watch it now before it gets pulled! Final episodes start tomorrow!

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[50/50] Album #35: “Move Like This”

Monday, May 27th, 2013

Album #35: Move Like This — The Cars (2011)

I’ll say the same thing I said when this record came out:

the cars alt cover“The simple fact that I can write a sentence with the phrase ‘new Cars album’ is reason enough to celebrate. That it’s actually a solid, catchy record is a minor miracle. 24 years after they called it quits, a sudden impulse overtook Ric Ocasek, and he decided to get the band back together one more time. Maybe he was feeling old, or, more likely, Ocasek didn’t want the awful “Door to Door” to be The Cars’ swan song, but whatever the reason,  — OH MY GOD THERE’S A NEW CARS ALBUM.

“Granted, it isn’t perfect: Benjamin Orr, who died of cancer in 2000, is sorely missed. It was Orr’s voice that carried the band’s ballads, and Ocasek isn’t up to the task, straining to match the gossamer tones the songs need. That said, Ocasek’s writing is as beat and whip-smart as ever, and the overall effect is incredible. They somehow managed to pick up their original sound, as if they had stepped out for a smoke instead of taking a quarter century break, with songs that both recall their biggest hits and feel completely new. In it’s review, the AV Club said, ‘considering how many other bands have tried to make modern versions of classic Cars songs, it’s nice to see the original article doing it better than most.’”

“This isn’t just a nostalgic cash grab by a bunch of old dudes playing at new wavers. Ocasek’s lyrics in particular are world worn, a generational coda to the capricious cool of their top 40 hits. As one critic said, ‘Sad Song’ is the bookend to ‘Let’s Go’ and ‘My Best Friend’s Girl,’ as though it’s sung by the same character thinking about how much he’s learned since. And ‘Hits Me’ is clearly penned by a guy who been through it all and just wants to get to next week. It is their darkest album since ‘Panorama.’

“And, still, it’s a joy. My brother saw them perform in Philly (at the Electric Factory no less) and said, while they weren’t a great live act they were never a great live act. Yet, it was absolutely clear these four guys were just plain happy to be on stage and playing together, and that reenergized youthful enthusiasm — along with a fans who felt the same way — made for a great show. While it would have been good to see them one more time, I’m just happy I’ve got one more Cars album to listen to, one that fits perfectly along side their very best stuff.”

Magic: The Revisiting

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Over at the AV Club, Steve Heisler has a sweet and even touching look back at the game “Magic: The Gathering,” how we become nostalgic for something, and if it’s possible to re-experience a sense of wonder for something that was once important to you.

Context is what turns objects into artifacts. To most people, things are just things, unless we’ve decided to attach value—a memory, an explanation.

The whole thing is worth reading, especially if you’re a gamer — and particularly for me: his experience ran somewhat parallel to mine. I’m reposting a piece I wrote on it five years ago, partly for context, but mostly because the blog it originally appeared on has since been wiped out.

Equilibrium

14 years ago, in the late summer of 1993, I remember reading about this game called “Magic: The Gathering.” It was played with cards but you and your friends actually bought different random decks so everyone had a unique mix. What intrigued me (other than the art, which looked fabulous) was that no two decks were alike. It was a fascinating concept, and I recall quite clearly holding this idea in my head that we would each carry around this one unique deck.

Remember that line, so you can laugh at it later.

Being a Trostle, I of course filed away the article, fully intending to check it out “some day” (… hey, games came out all the time and I still had many I had bought we had yet to play, so what was a few months or years, right?) A few weeks later, a guy from one of my regular gaming groups called up all atwitter, said we had to come over that night and try this new game he had discovered. It was, of course, Magic. Bastard had stolen my thunder.

No matter. Magic tore through our group — and the gaming world — like a lightning bolt. We stopped playing anything else for almost a year. Even my wife remarked on it, and for her to notice anything about the games we played, well — the observation was telling. (Funny, too, but when we first started playing everyone remarked how like “Talisman” the card game seemed; years later, when we dusted off Talisman, we all remarked how much it reminded us of “Magic”).

My friends and I managed to catch the tail-end of the first release, before the initial print run sold out and cards became hard to find. It was all new and fun and challenging, and there was this heady headiness to it all like, I’m not kidding, falling in love. We played as often as we could and when we weren’t playing we were thinking about playing. In retrospect, that period lasted all of six weeks, maybe less, and I think the rest of the time we were trying to recapture that first high. The same was probably true of the publisher, Wizards of the Coast, who was caught off guard by the success of their creation. They threw their original game plan out the window and flooded the market with new sets and reprints.

Magic shook up the entire gaming industry in fact, and pushed me to the point were I got interested in getting back in the business — I even applied to Wizards of the Coast for a job but luckily (if this story is to be believed) didn’t get it. Personally, it was all downhill as well — when new sets came out, gamers bought cards by the shovel-load, and I couldn’t compete monitarily. When one friend eventually sold his collection he counted over 15,000 cards — 250 decks worth! — and bought a new top of the line computer with the payoff.

The sense of mystery and discovery were gone as well. I came over the night after one set was released, looking forward to opening a few bright new packs — only to find that two of the guys had taken the day off work, bought several cases of the release, and opened and sorted them all already. This was about a year after the game had originally been published, and already it had become mechanized, automated, all about volume.

WOTC put out new versions where the printing was poorly handled (some said deliberately, to drive up the secondary market on original cards), tournament rules were constantly changed to force you to buy more cards, snotty gamers sucked all the joy out of trading and even casual play, and during one convention, someone stole my most valuable card. Dare I say it: the magic was gone.

We ran a couple of small leagues, which admittedly were fun, but overall the game became a burden. Eventually, 3 or so years after first playing it and bitter, I sold my collection. My best guess is I broke even. I kept a handful of favorites and enough cards to make about 2 decks (which was how I first envisioned the game) and moved on.

+ + +

Fast forward to the next decade. Magic was still around and bigger than ever, even if it was a souless money-making machine and now looked like Pokemon. When our neighbor’s 12-year-old son found out I used to play, he brought his cards over and challenged me to a duel. I crushed him. Then I showed him how to build a better deck.

Over the next few years, Eli and his friends picked up thousands of cards. He entered and won tournaments, and began giving me tips on deck construction. Even though I absolutely hated the new card designs, WOTC had flooded the market with so many sets over the preceding years, you could find decent older stuff for cheap and I started buying cards again, if only to compete with Eli. The old obsession had returned.

As Eli got ready to go to college however, I realized I was going to lose my main (ok, only) competitor. Like so many other things in my life that have recently folded themselves up and put themselves on the shelf, it was clear it was time to put the cards away again.

Anyway, I helped Eli sort thru all his cards — which had been literally dumped in a drawer some years ago as he discovered girls and guitars — and got them organized as he packed for school. I couldn’t stand to see them languish there. He talked of selling them to help pay for school, or passing them on to the younger brother of a friend, but he’ll probably keep a deck or three with which to play. Then, I got out my own collection and divided them up. This time I am keeping five decks (symbolically enough the number of colors in Magic.)

I gave all the rest to Elliot, the 6-year-old son of my friend Kevin. He was overwhelmed by the gift, and excited by each and every card in the box. They are ALL new and mysterious to him, and he and his father are having a great time discovering the game together.

As for me, I am done buying cards. No really. Here’s how I know. The last card I bought from my last buying spree on eBay finally arrived in the mail yesterday.

Appropriately enough, it is titled “Equilibrium.”

[Originally posted August 8, 2007]

Top 5 albums of 2011: Part II: Electric Boogaloo

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

#1 The Cars — Move Like This

The simple fact that I can write a sentence with the phrase “new Cars album” is reason enough to celebrate. That it’s actually a solid, catchy record is a minor miracle. 24 years after they called it quits, a sudden impulse overtook Ric Ocasek, and he decided to get the band back together one more time. Maybe he was feeling old, or, more likely, Ocasek didn’t want the awful Door to Door to be The Cars’ swan song, but whatever the reason,  — OH MY GOD THERE’S A NEW CARS ALBUM.


Granted, it isn’t perfect: Benjamin Orr, who died of cancer in 2000, is sorely missed. A lot of people pointed out that it was Orr’s voice that carried the band’s ballads, and Ocasek isn’t up to the task, straining to match the gossamer tones the songs need. That said, Ocasek’s writing is as beat and whip-smart as ever, and the overall effect is incredible. They somehow managed to pick up their original sound as if they had stepped out for a smoke instead of taking a quarter century break, with songs that both recall their biggest hits and feel completely new. In it’s review, the AV Club said, “considering how many other bands have tried to make modern versions of classic Cars songs, it’s nice to see the original article doing it better than most.”


This isn’t just a nostalgic cash grab by a bunch of old dudes playing at new wavers. Ocasek’s lyrics in particular are world worn, a generational coda to the capricious cool of their top 40 hits. As one critic said, “Sad Song” is the bookend to “Let’s Go” and “My Best Friend’s Girl,” as though it’s sung by the same character thinking about how much he’s learned since. And “Hits Me” is clearly penned by a guy who been through it all and just wants to get to next week. It is their darkest album since Panorama.


And, still, it’s a joy. My brother saw them perform in Philly (at the Electric Factory no less) and said, while they weren’t a great live act they were never a great live act. Yet, it was absolutely clear these four guys were just plain happy to be on stage and playing together, and that reenergized youthful enthusiasm — along with a fans who felt the same way — made for a great show. While it would have been good to see them one more time, I’m just happy I’ve got one more Cars album to listen to, one that fits perfectly along side their very best stuff.

Honorable Mention: Daft Punk — TRON: Legacy 

Technically, this came out in 2010 along with the film of the same name, but I didn’t pick it until well into last year. None of which changes the fact that I played this soundtrack in 2011 more than any record I’ve bought in years. TRON: Legacy — the movie — is seriously flawed and, I strongly suspect, would have failed if it weren’t for this stunning techno score. It is the best thing about the movie, and pulls the story along even when the plot, acting and special effects refuse to do so.


Beyond their driving synth numbers, the duo of Daft Punk — who, with their robot-masked public personas were tailor made to work on this movie (and indeed appeared as themselves in one scene) — composed a tight orchestration that is a worthy successor to Wendy Carlos original TRON score, and belongs among the most famous and listenable of soundtracks.


I’ve listened to it while writing, while playing games, while cooking, while folding laundry — seriously, there is nothing it can’t make more exciting.