Archive for the ‘Avalon Hill’ Tag

[50/50] Game #14: Wings of War

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Tabletop Game #14: Wings of War (2004) and Richthofen’s War (1972)

As today is 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War, this is a timely entry. So to speak.

Unlike WWII, which still fuels the wargame industry like a perpetual motion machine, WWI was never a particularly popular era with gamers — with one grand exception. Anything that recreates the aerial dogfights of The Great War sells well — and are invariably fun to play. As deadly as the first use of the aeroplane was in combat (usually to their pilots), the high-flying romance of the period continues to enthrall game designers a century later. Plus, you get to shoot down your buddies, over and over!

There have been dozens of board, video and computer games published over the decades, such as the exceptionally clever Ace of Aces, an elaborately designed pair of books that allows two players to simulate a dog fight, though Avalon Hill’s Richthofen’s War is a sentimental favorite — if for no other reason than it was the first wargame I ever played. It blew me away, and I was hooked after one game. Not just on Richthofen’s War, but wargames in general. Like so many of AH’s titles, it also was slyly educational; soon my brother and I could tell you why a Spad 13 was better than a Sopwith Camel, and pick out the silhouette’s of planes that hadn’t graced the skies in 50 years.

wings of warThe winner though, goes to Wings of War, a game that is simply ingenious in its simplicity. The design is brilliant because you can teach anyone how to play in less than a minute. Turns are lightning fast, and dozens of people can fly at the same time, making it a perfect convention game. With large matches, players also get a true sense of the chaos and capriciousness of a dogfight in the skies over the trenches of WWI, and why a pilot’s career rarely lasted long.

wings of rusty

 

[50/50] Game #15: Twixt (1962)

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

Tabletop Game #15: Twixt (1962)

twixt_2_lgFor board games, the 1960s were a golden age — literally. While commercial games had been popular since the late 19th century, and Monopoly a runaway best seller since the Depression, America’s burgeoning middle-class had card tables and suburban rec rooms to fill coming out of the ’50s. Milton Bradley, Parker Brothers and Ideal all saw explosive growth thanks to TV show tie-ins and national ad campaigns. Less than a decade old, Avalon Hill found nothing but success with its line of complex, elaborate wargames. Everybody was making money publishing games — or so it seemed — so it made sort of sense when 3M decided to get into the game.

Yes, that 3M: the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company, home to, among other things, sandpaper, Scotch tape and Post-it Notes. In 1962, 3M released the first of what would become three dozen titles in its Bookshelf Games series. Aimed at adults, they had an air of sophistication about them: each came in a faux-leather slip case (with gold lettering!), the better to sit next to all those leather bound classics on the bookshelves of one’s den, and bold illustrated covers that wouldn’t have been out of place in the pages of Playboy or Esquire. The result, says blogger Codex99, “was a rather elegant and sophisticated house style that has really not been seen since.”

twixt_lgM took advantage of its expertise in manufacturing and design, delivering products with plastic boards and metal playing pieces. They put out financial sims (Stocks & Bonds, Acquire), party and trivia games, and a slew of sports titles, but 3M is best remembered for their efforts to try and create “the new chess” and invent an original abstract strategy game for modern times. They came closest with Twixt, a connect the dots title that still has a following today. Twixt is a deceptively simple game, with two players taking turns placing pegs on a grid. If the pegs are close enough, they can be connected with links; the first player to build a bridge across the board wins. As with chess, patterns quickly emerge. Specific tactics have been developed for every situation, but simply reacting to your opponent will get you crushed; this is a game that rewards thinking ahead.